Riots= Controlled Opposition?

This week, we’ve all been inundated with stories and images about the rioting in Baltimore, which was precipitated by the mysterious death of Freddie Gray while in police custody. Those of you who have perused You Tube regularly know that there is a plethora of videos out there, seemingly a new one every day, documenting police abuse of citizens. Clearly, police forces all over America are out of control.

So, why did this particular incident invoke such outrage, such violence? Why didn’t the 2012 tragic death of Milton Hall, a homeless Black man, which involved six White police officers firing forty six shots at the unarmed citizen, elicit the same kind of protests? Or the 2014 incident in Georgia, where a White police officer pulled a gun on an eleven year old Black youngster, then forced him and his friends to the ground, all the while using profanity? Their crime? Building a tree house.

There are many videos readily available to the public, in which White police officers shoot, taser or otherwise harass Black Americans. But there are lots of videos as well of White, Black and Hispanic police officers shooting, tasering, or otherwise abusing Whites, Hispanics, Asians, etc. The beating death of Kelly Thomas, who was White, was perhaps one of the most egregious examples of this. Police officers literally beat him to death, as he screamed for mercy and called for his father, and the entire incident was caught on videotape. Despite this ironclad evidence of guilt, a brainless jury acquitted two police officers of any wrongdoing. If ever there should have been riots about police brutality, that verdict should have precipitated them.

What has happened, especially with the mainstream media’s typically distorted and inept coverage of the riots, is that the issue of police misconduct has been lost in the shuffle. Instead, the event has been turned into a familiar racial battle, with Blacks generally directing their anger at random Whites, and Whites repulsed by all the looting and violence, and therefore siding with the cops. Typical of the media coverage was all the attention given to the mother who slapped her son and berated him for rioting. Conservatives ate that one up. Maybe the Republicans will run the mother for political office.

As I documented in my book Hidden History: An Expose of Modern Crimes, Conspiracies, and Cover-Ups in American Politics, intelligence agencies have been notorious for infiltrating potentially subversive groups, on both the Left and Right extremes. We know, for instance, that John Ali, national secretary for the Nation of Islam, was an uncover FBI agent. We also know that one of the four KKK members who were in the car where the shots that killed Civil Rights activist Viola Liuzzo were fired from was undercover FBI informant Gary Rowe. Both Timothy Leary and Gloria Steinem were eventually exposed as being affiliated with the CIA.

One of the oddest aspects of all urban rioting, going back to the 1960s, is just how contained it always is. I have often wondered why these frustrated souls just don’t march into wealthier areas, and burn down those houses. Why do they always burn down their own houses, their own stores? In the case of the Baltimore riots, since their argument was with the police, why didn’t they march en masse on police stations? Why not congregate in great numbers outside the state supreme court, the governor’s mansion, or any other conveniently located seat of power? What is being accomplished by damaging their own neighborhoods? Please understand that I am not advocating that anyone burn down anything. It’s just that the motivation in these riots always seems skewered.

So, hypothetically, is it that outrageous to suggest that a certain number of undercover agents and informants control these riots? That they direct the crowd’s anger towards random targets who have nothing to do with the issue at hand? That they keep the mob from moving out of their own area, and perhaps even initiate the burning of homes and businesses? This is pure speculation, of course, but it’s reasonable speculation.

As long as our corrupt leaders can keep us fractionalized, warring with each other over race, religion, gender and ethnicity; they succeed in directing our attention away from their own misdeeds. Their corruption and incompetence impacts everyone, of every race, sex and creed. Police abuse of power affects everyone as well. There should have been public hearings in Congress long ago on this issue, with police chiefs all across the country grilled relentlessly on why they permitted bully officers to remain on the force. Instead, we have this overtly controlled demonstration of anger, channeled safely into another Black vs. White “debate,” with talking heads on Fox News and MSNBC making sure the discussion remains within acceptable parameters.

The abuse of power on the part of law enforcement officers at all levels, all over this nation, is the issue. We shouldn’t let it become a circus, led by the likes of Al Sharpton, who was exposed a while back as being an FBI informant himself. It’s wrong for police to harass, hurt and kill citizens who are unarmed and dangerous. Our leaders and our media ought to be focusing on that, and not pure racial politics.

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About donaldjeffries

Author of the best seller "Hidden History: An Expose of Modern Crimes, Conspiracies, and Cover-Ups in American Politics," published in November 2014 by Skyhorse Publishing. Author of the 2007 sci-fi/fantasy novel "The Unreals," which has been described as a cross between The Wizard of Oz and The Twilight Zone, and compared to A Confederacy of Dunces and classic Russian literature. A second edition of "The Unreals" was published in February 2015 by Pocol Press. Long time JFK assassination researcher. Marketing more fiction and nonfiction, including a book about bullying and the social hierarchy, and a book about the Natalee Holloway case.

Posted on April 30, 2015, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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